Dance Party Massacre Posters

Looking to dress up your wall with some fresh new artwork? If so, check out the latest release from our friends at Dance Party Massacre. They’ve just released silkscreened versions of some of their best-selling designs. They are silkscreened on 100lb, acid-free, archival paper. They’re perfect for framing in your office, man den, or new dorm room. The posters are available now from the Dance Party Massacre online shop and they range in price from $9.95 to $16.95.

Dance Party Massacre Summer 2010 Line

Dance Party Massacre recently released their Summer 2010 line featuring a slew of T-Shirts and tank tops ready made for the summer heat. Alex Dakoulas, founder of Dance Party Massacre, decided to take a more art director approach and invited a few guest designers to collaborate with on the summer line, including Matt Skiff, Joe Kelly, and Mario Jalbert.

The line features the Dance Party Massacre elements that we have come accustomed to, including gore mixed in with a little light fun. You’ll also notice this line in particular features a more retro era feel reminiscent of 50’s black and white movies and biker gangs. Pieces from the new line, including tees, tanks and v-necks, range in price from $19.95 to $23.95 but be sure to use the coupon code “COTYG” at checkout for an additional 10% off your entire order! Go and buy some DPM gear now!

The Dance Party Massacre crew put together a neat little video documenting some behind the scenes action involving the summer 2010 line, specifically the product photoshoot. Take a peek at it below!

Rebel With A Cause

The Horror Club

Knife Fight

Live While You Can

Dance party Massacre Summer 2010 Line

Everything You Need to Know About T-Shirts in 1000 Words

The History of the T-Shirt in 1000 Words

The History of T-Shirts in 320 Words

One-piece “union suits” are cut into separate top and bottom pieces. The top part of the union suit is long enough to be tucked into the waistband of bottoms. Miners and stevedores use the T-Shirt to combat the hot environment. The United States Navy makes the T-Shirt standard issue at around 1918 and are used as undergarments worn under uniforms. The T-Shirt appears in Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary for the first time in 1922. During the Great Depression the T-Shirt becomes the default garment for many workers. The Wizard of Oz releases the first promotional T-Shirt in 1939. Presidential candidate Thomas E. Dewey was the first to put a political slogan on a T-Shirt and it said “Dew-It With Dewey.” Charlie Brown first appears in a T-Shirt in 1950. Following World War II it is common to see veterans wearing T-Shirts with their trousers as casual clothing. Marlon Brando turns the T-Shirt into a fashion statement after wearing one in A Streetcar Named Desire in 1951. In 1955, James Dean appears in Rebel Without A Cause in a white T-Shirt making it the symbol of rebellious youth.

Tank tops, A-Shirts (wife beaters), muscle shirts, scoop shirts and v-necks are developed as variants to the T-Shirt. Plastisol ink is developed in 1959 allowing variety in T-Shirt designs. Screen printing becomes the most popular form of T-Shirt printing. Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara graces the T-Shirt of many activitsts in the 1960’s. John Sebastian and Janis Joplin popularize tie-dyed shirts. Jacqueline Bisset appears in the movie The Deep in 1977 and is seen surfacing wearing a white T-Shirt and a bikini underneath – the Wet T-Shirt is born. Thermochromatic dyes are introduced in the 80’s and change color when subjected to heat. In the 90’s, Hip Hop afficianados wear T-Shirts that extend to their knees. Threadless revolutionizes the way T-Shirts are designed and sold online in the 2000’s with their crowd sourcing model of business.

Charlie Brown

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