Halo Teabag

I’ve never played Halo. Yeah, I’m not much of a gamer. Despite that, I can still appreciate this lovely shirt from our friends at NerdyShirts. For those of you so incline, check out the this older post for a little video and even more tea bagging inspired shirts!

Halo Teabag by NerdyShirts

Halo Teabag by NerdyShirts

Softwear by Microsoft

Microsoft has turned to hip-hop icon, Common, to spearhead their new venture into T-Shirts. That’s right, our buddies in Redmond have decided to pour a couple more bucks into trying to be hip. Maybe the Apple rebuttal commercials weren’t working and so they had to revise their marketing game plan? The new collection of tees, known as Softwear by Microsoft can now be found on the Microsoft site, though, there are no links to purchase the tees just yet (it says they will be available by December 15). The collection consists of 4 tees designed by Microsoft, dubbed “Classic Designs” and 4 tees designed by Common.

Being the Apple fanboy that I am, I would never be caught in one of these, but, I am sure that since Windows has more than 90% OS marketshare, there will be people interested in buying these.

We need Apple lead designer, Jonathan Ive, to dream up some Apple branded tee designs. Though if he did design them, they might end up being simply solid (and blank) white, black or grey tees. At least they would match my Apple gear!

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Microsofts New Ad Campaign

Apparently, Microsoft has decided to embark on a 300 million dollar marketing blitz in hopes of changing the image that Apple has portrayed PC users to be with their “I’m a Mac, I’m a PC” ad campaign. They say imitation is the greatest form of flattery, but my goodness, will Microsoft ever be able to come up with anything original?

Instead of trying to defend themselves by repeatedly using a line that Apple made into catchphrase they once again demonstrate a lack of innovation and creativity. This is the story of Microsoft. This is a lame attempt by Microsoft to appear hip. They even tried extra hard by getting Pharrell Williams and Eva Longoria in the commercial, when the recently short-lived and ill-fated Gates-Seinfeld campaign failed. 

It hurts Microsoft even more that Pharrell and some of the other notables in the “I’m a PC” campaign are known Mac users. It turns out that Pharrell has stated as having used an ”Apple Power Mac Dual 1.8 GHz G5 with Cinema Display” to produce the album Seeing Sounds. Pharrel has also talked about his love for the iPod on many occasions, here’s an example. 

Microsoft, instead of trying to make yourself look cool and hip by buying out a Mac user, like Pharrell Williams, who has hip-hop credentials and the coolness factor you so desire, maybe you should focus your ad campaigns on your products. I hear Windows Vista makes for a great operating system. Or not.

Update: Further digging by some intrepid people in InternetLAND has found that Macs were used to create the images distributed and posted on the Microsoft’s Web site for the “I’m a PC” ad campaign. Here’s an excerpt form the article:

Several digital images that Microsoft has posted on its Web site to trumpet its new “I’m a PC” ad campaign were actually created on Macs, according to the files’ originating-software stamp.

Four of the images that Microsoft made available on itsPressPass site last week display the designation “Adobe Photoshop C3 Macintosh” when their file properties are examined. The images appear to be frames from the television ads that Microsoft launcehd Thursday.

One of the images is of a real Microsoft engineer, identified only as “Sean,” who resembles John Hodgman, the actor who plays the PC character in Apple’s iconic ads. Reportedly, Microsoft will play off Apple’s own campaign—during which Hodgman introduces himself with the line, “Hello, I’m a PC”—with its engineer saying “Hello, I’m a PC, and I’ve been made into a stereotype.”

Other images posted by Microsoft last Thursday include shots of author Deepak Chopra; Canadian adventurer and educator Geoff Green, founder of Students on Ice Expeditions; and a shark-surround diver named “Meaghan.”

Not all of the images on the PressPass site were generated on Macs. The sample print ads, which highlight the campaign’s “Life Without Walls” slogan, were produced using the Windows version of Adobe Photoshop, according to their files.

The originating software and platform can be found in downloaded versions of the files using built-in tools on either a Mac running Mac OS X or on a PC running Windows.

In Windows XP, for instance, users can view the tag by right-clicking the downloaded file, selecting Properties from the drop-down menu, then clicking the Summary tab. “Adobe Photoshop CS3 Macintosh” appears beside “Creation Software.”

On a Mac, after opening the downloaded file in Preview, users can see the tag by choosing Inspector from the Tools menu, clicking on the middle More Info tab, then clicking on the tab marked TIFF. “Adobe Photoshop CS3 Macintosh” appears beside “Software.”

Microsoft’s campaign is the creation of the Crispin Porter + Bogusky agency, part of a $300 million effort to revamp Windows Vista’s reputation.