Screen Printing Photo Tutorial by ApachCreation and Grafitee

Here’s a great tutorial that I stumbled upon on the French tee blog, Grafitee. The tutorial was done by French artist, Apach from ApachCreation. You can go here to see the original blog post, but be forewarned, it’s in French. If you don’t understand French then I’ve translated the original post (or Google did) here for the English speaking tee fans. Lot’s of pictures, so brace yourself – it’s cool stuff! *Everything in quotes was written by ApachCreation for Grafitee and was translated to English (don’t blame me if the translation is incorrect, blame Google!). Thanks to ApachCreation for such a great set of photos. 

“Here is a tutorial that will explain how to make a t-shirt silkscreened by hand. I did not have the equipment to carry out a t-shirt so I called Apach, a passionate screenprinter who is fairly well equipped.”

T-Shirt Tutorial by ApachCreation and Grafitee

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Modeling Your T-Shirts 101 (Part 2)

Modeling Your T-Shirts 101 is a guest post that was written by tee and belt designer, Jon Wye. In Part 2, Jon discusses how to take model shots creatively  on the cheap. If you missed Part 1, check it out, Jon discusses how to create quality product shots using a DIY lighting box.

Method 2: Work The Camera In Your Kitchen.

With the previous method you can make your tees look as good as the big boys and the quality and style of the photos works for a small designer and a large designer.

But if you want to have your t-shirts on models (my new choice for displaying the tees online) it’s not that hard, just takes a little more time and patience.

1. Fabric Store Field Trip. Start by taking a field trip to your local fabric store or even your local home décor store. Head straight for the upholstery and home furnishings fabric section, look for the thick stuff. Make sure to bring your camera.

Jon Wye at the Fabric Store

2. Have fun! With a friend, pick out your top 5 or 6 favorite fabrics and start photographing each other posing in front of the fabrics or laying on them on the floor.

3. Review. I picked out many fabrics that I loved in person but ultimately looked bad bad bad through the lense of the camera.

Have Fun When Choosing Fabric

4. Two Yards or More. When you’ve found the fabric that suits your best, buy no less than 2 yards worth. You will need enough to go over your head and below your waist.

5. Positive Reinforcement. Treat yourself to a McDonald’s Cheeseburger, you’ve earned it!

McDonald's Cheeseburger

6. Hang and Tighten. Go back to your pad and hang your new fabric. Make sure it is very tight and shows no wrinkles.

7. Prepare Lighting. Bust out as many lamps as you can find and shine the light away from the fabric. Get some white paper, or better yet, some white foam board, and bounce the light back on the fabric. Indirect light is the best light for modeling.

8. WHITE BALANCE YOUR CAMERA. Again, this is very important. Photoshop can only correct so much. You will need to take a picture of something WHITE that is in front of the fabric (but not with any part of the fabric in it) and balance your camera off of that image. Again, consult your users manual. White Balancing takes some reading to understand, so don’t beat yourself up. Essentially you are telling your camera what your consider to be pure white in the photo, and your camera should adjust all the colors it sees around that. You’ll probably need to do some Photoshop work, but not a lot.

9. Work The Camera. Don’t be afraid to be yourself. That is very important. Too often I see model shots where the people are looking far too serious for their own good! To me, it’s a turn off! I laugh, thinking, are you really that full of yourself to strike a pose that looks more like a epileptic fit with make-up on.

Model It!

Modeling Your T-Shirts 101 (Part 1)

Modeling Your T-Shirts 101 is a guest post that was written by tee and belt designer, Jon Wye. In Part 1, Jon discusses how to create quality product shots using a DIY lighting box.

After four years of trying various photography methods for T-shirt display I’ve learned a few things that, with the help of Coty, thought I might pass on.

When I first started my company I was convinced that the photos had to be the best. I pulled in a favor from a professional photographer friend. Rented backdrops, rigging, lighting, lighting, lighting. Lighting is expensive. Asked a few attractive friends to help model. I even hired a professional hair and makeup team. My girlfriend, Nikki, was the hostess and helped provide a constant source of conversation and food.

It was the most professional endeavor I had organized to date! The photos came back amazing! My T-shirts were looking like a million dollars. The products looked hot, the models looked hot. Everything was in place.

I launched the new photos of the new products. Day one, day two, day three: where were my sales??? I didn’t get it. I had created some world-class imagery! Surely people would see my stuff and want to buy.

I realized many many months later that the problem wasn’t the photos, it was the fact that my site, my fans, my image, my WALLET wasn’t ready for a photo shoot like that. I was trying to walk the walk too early, portray myself as a bigger designer than I really was. So I took a step back and asked, are they buying me or my tees? And the answer was both. All the fancy photos were distracting from me, the small designer, selling you my vision.

So I took my licks and kept pushing ahead. And so I keep it small time, but really fun and classy!

And over the years I have come up with a few good methods for photographing on the cheap and hip, and just wanted to share some of them.

Method 1: The Abercrombie Method (no models)

Despite whatever violent ideas come to mind when you think of Abercrombie they have an impressive and consistent method for t-shirt photography; the precisely wrinkled head-on t-shirt photo. Check out their stuff, you’ll understand. Basically they take a freshly ironed shirts and do some hand wrinkling to make it look rugged, wearable, hip, and intentional.

But how do they get such good lighting and all those cool mini shadows that form from the wrinkled tees? The quick answer is a professionally lit photography room, but I’m guessing if you are reading this then you probably don’t have one and neither do I. But you can create a mini lighting box!

1. Paint It White. Get two 4 ft. X 4ft. board and paint them a matte white finish. Make sure it is matte white! And paint on enough layers to be completely opaque. The t-shirt will lie on one board and the other will go on the top of your creation.

White Paint

2. Built The Frame. Find a way to build a 4 ft. X 4 ft X 4 ft. frame (I used PVC pipes and fittings). Place that frame over the 4 X 4 board you just painted.

PVC Pipes

PVC Box

3. Cover It Up. Drape a WHITE cloth over all four sides of the frame. You can buy something called white duvotene cloth from many stage supply houses, and it will block out excess light from within your frame, but still keep the interior white.

4. Cover It Up. Take your second painted board and cut a 5 inch hole in the center of it, this is where your camera lense will go through.

5. Add The Lights. Go to the hardware store and buy four duel fluorescent lighting fixtures (3 ft in length). Buy some DAYLIGHT BALANCED bulbs to go in them. Now screw those into the white side of the 4 by 4 board that has the hole in it. Starting to make sense?

You are basically done with the build. In the end you should have a 4 by 4 by 4 cube that has a white board as a base (one that you lay the t-shirt on) and a white board on top that has lights attached and a hole in the center for a camera.

Lighting

6. Set Your White Balance. Turn the lights on and watch that baby glow. Don’t put any t-shirt in the box yet. Before you start shooting you need to WHITE BALANCE your camera from the light and color inside the box. Consult you camera’s manual to determine how to properly white balance. This is extremely important or your images will turn out like crap.

Cameras

7. Take some photos. Start putting those t-shirts in your new lighting box and start snapping away.

Octopus Boy by Jon Wye

Color Separations Tutorial by Jimmy Heartcore

Here’s a great little video tutorial on how to prep your images for screen printing – the essential art of color separation. And of course, whenever a video is narrated by Jimmy Heartcore, you know that it’ll be good! For those of you unfamiliar with Jimmy, he is one of the premier indie tee screen printers, and he also runs his own clothing brand on the side – Heartcore Clothing.


Spot Color Separations In Photoshop from Jimmy Heartcore on Vimeo.